Developing a mobile health tool by co-design

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Healthier Lives is supporting a PhD project to examine how effective co-design is for developing a mobile health tool for Māori. Co-design is the partnership between researchers and end-users across the whole of the research activity. While there are a growing number of kaupapa Māori research frameworks, there are fewer evaluation-specific frameworks which determine the merit, value and worth of a co-design process.

PhD candidate, Debbie Goodwin will be investigating A kaupapa Māori evaluation of a co-design mHealth Project with Māori communities. The Ora co-design project is a partnership between a Healthier Lives research team and Māori community partner organisations and representatives.  Debbie’s research will co-develop a kaupapa Māori evaluation framework with these partners to then evaluate the Ora’s co-design process used in developing the mHealth tool.

Evaluation of co-design programmes is a particularly new area of health research and Debbie will focus on how kaupapa Māori approaches can contribute to understanding the value of this approach for Māori.  Debbie hopes to identify effective co-design processes for developing interventions in Māori communities, and learn more about how effective co-design can occur between academic institutions and indigenous communities.