Implementation framework to aid outcomes in indigenous communities

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He Pikinga Waiora, a Healthier Lives research project focussed on reducing health inequities and achieving health equity for Māori, has recently revealed the potential of a unique framework for research within indigenous communities.

Researchers developed the He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework using indigenous and mainstream theoretical foundations and empirical evidence. They then applied the framework to a systematic review of 13 studies and found that approaches to cultural-centeredness and community engagement could help explain the differences in outcomes of diabetes prevention programmes in indigenous communities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States.

Key findings from this research are outlined in a paper published in the October 2017 issue of the international journal, Globalization and Health.

He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework was first developed in 2016 and has already been used successfully in several health interventions, including the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm screening study for Māori and an HRC-funded study to improve outcomes for hospitalised children and their whanau. The research team has also advised several other groups, which are planning to use it in the roll out of national health programmes.

The Framework is designed to improve the uptake of prevention and treatment programmes within culturally diverse health care settings. While intended for use as a tool to aid the design and implementation of effective health interventions for Māori communities, it also has promise as an evaluation tool.

Read the article here:

Implementation framework for chronic disease intervention effectiveness in Māori and other indigenous communities Globalization and Health (2017) 13:69

 

Related links:

He Pikinga Waiora Implementation Framework 2016 (PDF 13.7 MB)

He Pikinga Waiora: making health interventions work for Māori communities